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to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. [ command center ] this is command center. [ man ] ...3, 2, 1. [ command center ] all systems go. [ female announcer ] introducing swiffer steamboost powered by bissell. steam-activated cleaning pads penetrate deep. [ command center ] we have lift off. [ female announcer ] don't just clean your floor. boost it. >>> live from america's news headquarters, i'm kelly wright. a massive wildfire triggering a state of emergency in san francisco. the flames are about 150 miles away in yosemite national park. but the city's utilities are in danger, as miles of power lines lay in the path of the fire. officials say san francisco has been forced to shut down two of the power stations so far. further disruption could have effect on the power su
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
between black and white perceptions. he is the measure of the alienation of black america from white america so he knows if he is outrageous and people attack him there will be a tendency to support him because he is now being beleaguered by the very people who are being viewed as the people who are oppressing. he would make these outrageous comments and he would be attacked by everyone and he would come in town without a single bit of advertising and draw people to a rally because people were rallying around the attacked brother. it's much the same in the arab world. when saddam hussein was making bold and outrageous comments he was praying on the alienation and frustration and anger of people who feel that their histories out of control, that they are being beleaguered by the west, that they have no ability to shape their destiny. and so here's this guy standing up and defending him. james baker understood that. in 1991 he spoke before a congressional testimony and said why don't we do this and why do we do that? james baker said understand what saddam is doing is praying on arab a
history, talking about the pentagon papers, the water gate scandal, more recently their top secret america piece -- series, the walter reed medical hospital series that won him the pulitzer. there's the question of like is there going to be an investment -- and is there an investment in had this digital age in terms of that kind of reporting, that kind of granularity, that kind of fact finding and that commitment to stories that may not get a lot of click-throughs at the beginning or ever but matter in terms of information and awareness. >> well, i think the answer is both yes and i hope so, and it has to be. a couple things. a lot of this is due -- a lot of the kinds of journalism that you are talking about is due to the commitment of the families and the people who own these institutions. as john said, the grahams. i was lucky to have worked for the grahams because "newsweek" where i worked for many years is owned by "the washington post" company. i had a lot of of company with him. the grahams were an inspiration. before that i worked in louisville for the bingham family that owned "the
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
to be buying. the president of the americas jerry smith joins us exclusively. good to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> thank you for joining us. a good story you are selling more tablets and devices than pcs, right? >> we are proud of that. in the quarter, we had an outstanding quarter. it's a reflection of our strategy, we are now teleselling more phones than tablets. that's a part of our pc plus. we believe we are a device company now. >> i want to ask you about. that all the speculation out there is what is going to happen with blackberry. are you in a position to acquire blackberry in. >> i can't comment on possible acquisitions. i will say right now organically we grew our smartphone business successfully. we will look at potential value and if it fits from a strategy perspective as well. >> so let's look at the difference here him i have a black brry in my hand. can these two merge and be a better device? what do you think, jerry? >> we will keep looking at all opportunities. >> why wouldn't you buy blackberry in they're so popular? what would stop you, seriously in. >> i think
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
holly williams they're advising america where to attack. and is the comeback over? wall street worries about war and housing. >> a cbs news poll finds race relations are going backward in the u.s. we're on the national mall, marking 50 years since the historic march on washington. a ground-breaking court ruling says you can be in trouble for sending a text to someone who is driving. >> we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >> if the order comes, you're ready to go, like that? >> we're ready to go like that. >> washington weighs the consequences for syria. >> u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. >> this is turning into a regional conflict and we need to reverse it. now is an opportunity to do so. >> the dow had its worst day since june. as possible military strikes hangs over wall street. >> bragging about taking control over media websites including twitter and "the new york times." >> fire continues to spread near yosemite. now growing 280 square miles, destroying more than 100 buildings. >> final
to be the least aggrieved black man in america to be palatable to the wider electorate and that's what he did in 2008. we're now in 2013. he's been elected twice. it's the 50th anniversary. i don't see how he can speak without dealing directly with the issue of race without going there today. and then doing something else. not only talking about the issues that we kind of know how to address and know how to solve, vote rights, for example, we see was happening, we know how to organize. we know how to fight that. we have the tools and the laws in place to fight that. there are other things that are more complicated and more difficult to work on. the patterns of residential segregation that have led to schools in many parts of the country being segregated now as they were in 1970s or 1960s. that sort of thing is much more diffuse, much more complicated and that's what i hope i hear more about today not just from the president, but from other speakers as well. >> chris, to you gene's points the question of segregation in american society would seem to be settled but it's not you look at the stat
#mymarchdc. we want to hear your stories. >> it appears america is still not color blind. new study by tpeer research center, among blacks, jumps to 79% african-americans lag behind many whites 14% margin, 7 in 10 blacks are treated less fairly by police and courts. also this morning 50 years ago, voting rights a huge issue and remain so today. federal government suing state of texas over new id law which is discriminatory. >> texas is the only state that is discriminating in redistricting. in june, supreme court ruled to remove the -- to seek pre-clearance from the department of justice before making changes to election and redistricting laws. justice department is using a different part of the act in the texas case. now to the violent death of a community activist in d.c. >> police say someone shot timothy dawkins where he lived. the 24 year old studied to become a preacher. he had plans to run for ant commission e commissioner. >> he had an old soul. we traveled with kids to tennessee for training. we more examples especially black men. we lost out here. >> police don't have a suspect or
. and so, after nine years of separation an arrival gate in america. pure joy. >> hi, daddy. christie maynard who heard their story stepped in to help the family. >> very pretty. >> reporter: she took her on a shopping trip on her first day in america. >> it is so cool. >> yeah, let's go. it is so overwhelming, it makes me feel complete. >> reporter: and she already has a big american dream. >> i want to be a doctor, like for women who is pregnant, and small kids. >> reporter: ast steory that red us, sometimes god smiles and those who lived through dark days in africa can find light in a country founded on hope. bob woodruff, abc news, new york. >> what a great way. >> love that story. >> what a great we to end our newscast. the family reunited after nine years. boy do they have stories to tell each other. >> what a wonderful young woman she is. >> she will be a doctor. >> bet you she will. >> i can't wait to see it happen. good for them. >> see you in a little bit. ♪ >>> this the new york city police department now has to be part of the solution because the judge has agreed with us
, and what i often call apartheid in the southern part of the united states of america. so if you look at was going on from 1876 to 1895, in that 20 year period we saw the beginning of the end of full citizenship of african-americans in this country. so by the time robert smalls died in 1950, he died brokenhearted, and financially, not near as well off as he once was. and so i have spent a lot of time talking about the history of this. as i used to say to my students when i taught, if it happened before it can happen again. and we see all the speculation about what the supreme court is going to do with the most important civil rights act, which i think was the voting rights act of 1965. and most experts think that that's about to come to a significant, and i call, a noble end. oh grams of affirmative action, that simply means you're going to take positive steps. you can't be passive. you've got to take positive steps to overcome the current effects of past discrimination, the history. not going to happen by itself. if you bring that to a close, and people are speculating that that is a
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
. those are twot key questions being asked in the wake of major developments on america's crime beat. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder unveiled sweeping new criminal justice reforms saying long prison terms for drug offenses are not making the u.s. safer. >> we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, to deter, and rehabilitate, but not really to warehouse and to forget. >> reporter: meantime, the federal judge delivered a significant ruling. saying a hard line approach in new york city, a policy, stop and frisk has violated the constitutional rights of minorities. it was a blow for mayor michael bloomberg with far reaching implications. >> if this decision were to stand it would turn those precedents on their head and make our city and in fact the whole country a more dangerous place. >> reporter: the judge appointed a federal monitor saying police discrimination against blacks and latinos was widespread. with hundreds of thousands of innocent people stopped over the last decade. violent crime is down in new york and across the country. but if these tough laws g
shouted back no america, america. i had thrown my passport at them i was born in washington d.c.. they would kick me in the stomach when i would get my breath back and as others join the firing squad i would say america, america. at some point they take the guns from our heads we believe because we were from the same country. they would have to pay a price for killing us that they would never have to pay for killing them. a red cross jeep pulled up and the driver of the red cross jeep picked up this old man who was in a sewer ditch next to us. every time the soldiers beat him he would put up his hands and a prayer sign and they would smash the buts of their rifles into his face. we drove off to a hospital and they stopped us to get away from us and we drove as a human mouse to the hospital. they hung off the top of the ge. at the hospital the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. not because we were in worship and the people. that we were being dragged there. i think because of what we have represented. not just allen and i but i think americans. not just timor b
at "good morning america" one of the most hot dog resingsists. they would call me and say things. i would say good morning america. i did like the switch board. good morning america. they would say, was that a nazi that you had on today? i would say, yeah. you know, they would say how could you have a nazi on television? listen, i don't book the show, first of all, and if they're all in argentina, you have to fly them here. >> john: but they're blond, blue eyed. >> brand completely aggravate me about where is joan london. how the hell do i know? i'm answering phones. do i know where joan london is? >> john: you coul a receptionis. >> i got fired from that job. >> a beinger the chance of getting married is the same chance as being kidnapped by terrorists. to me they're the same thing. >> that wasn't humidity, that was the 80s. >> the hairdos i've been subjected to, oh my god. >> john: i bet they all looked great. >> where is that from? >> john: one of our staff found it. >> and the shiny jacket. >> john: it was from the 80s. i think one of the best moments are current network. i thought wa
creating competitive industry. >> but since 2000 there's only new carrier in our country virgin america. we have on the others one in minnesota but there new carrier viable since 2000. and don't you think there are to entry that make it hard for new airlines to competitive? over thenk if you look last many years there have been industry.ts into the jetblue is a great example of a -- that sprang grown last decade and has nationwide. so, i think there are ample opportunities and capital vailable for new airlines to enter the market. >> i note that jetblue is only we have nowrket and these three major carriers. do you want to respond? first off, again noting how complementary our two networks by putting them together we create a third competitor -- fourth competitor to what are three airlines larger ta and s, united, dell southwest and allows more competition, not less. 12 laps overlatch being out put00 -- overlapping we can more efficient service to consumers. also note that in the $1 billion synergies that i noted there s not one assumed fare increase. he synergies are not built on assum
something and they're upset. do you really think that me being here in front of 1500 people, that america is going to wake up tomorrow and change? >> john: lewis, i want to thank you for joining us on the final week of "viewpoint." we're going to have you on the clip tomorrow as well. you've inspired me and other comedians for such a long time. and more important after inspiring me you really make me laugh. it's a gift to have you here. stick around. while we might cover the news, up next we're joined by a peabody award winning not fake news line, the one and own brian lair. lewis black, everyone. [applause] >> ... and the thinkers thinking. >> okay, so there is wiggle room in the ten commandments is what you're telling me. >> she's joy behar. >> ya, i consider you jew-talian. >> okay, whatever you want. >> who plays kafka? >> who saw kafka? >> who ever saw kafka? >> (laughter). >> asking the tough questions. >> chris brown, i mean you wouldn't let one of your daughters go out with him. >> absolutely not. >> you would rather deal with ahmadinejad then me? >> absolutely! >> (singing) >> i
of america merrill lynch. we will grow by 8.2% this year, beating china for the fifth straight year. the energy front, our oil production has increased by 50% since 2005. iraq a expects to increase oil production to 4.5 million barrels by the end of 2014 and 9 million barrels a day by 2020. as the international energy agency has reported, iraq is poised to double our export of oil by the decade of 2015. -- of 2050. we will use our strained global oil markets. in spite of this progress, we have challenges that we are working to address. 90% of our economy depends on oil. unemployment rate is 11%, our poverty line rate is 23%. although there has been significant progress over the last few years, and we think the development millennium goals set by the united nations. in order to diversify our economy beyond energy, iraq is investing oil revenues in education and crucial development projects, including restoration of power and rebuilding our transportation system. our economy will benefit from our progress on the germanic front as well. last month, the united nations security council r
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
in the region. this is something that is going to require america's attention, hopefully the entire international community's attention. >> senator john mccain came on "new day" very strong on this. he believes the u.s.'s credibility in the region has been hurt, that a situation like syria, that he believes, there's been delay, and it has led to a bolds by the regime there, that in egypt that what many believe is a coup wasn't called a coup. >> i am sympathetic to senator mccain's passion for helping people work through what is an extraordinarily difficult and heart-breaking situation, but what i think the american people also expect me to do as president is to think through what we do from the perspective what is in our long-term national interest. sometimes what we've seen is folks will call for immediate action, jumping into stuff that does not turn out well, gets us mired in very difficult situations, can result in us being drawn in to very expensive, difficult, costly interventions that actually breed more resentment in the region. we have to think through strategically what is
reporters discuss their book "whitey bulger: america's most wanted gangster and the man hunt that brought him to justice." , the trialgan -- began june 12, 2013. [applause] >> thank you for coming out on such a beautiful day. we don't get a lot of those here. i'm with the chicago tribune, write a business column with kevin and shelly murphy of the boston globe who are here not to do scouting on the chicago black hawks. [laughter] but to talk about their new book on whitey bulger, the boston mobster caught on the lamb after, what, 16 years, and first of all, let's get -- you guys have been boston journalists for quite a long time at this point. >> somebody said between us it's, like, what, 16 years? yeah, we've been chasing him combined total for 25 -- i mean, 25 each, so 50 between us. >> wow. i was reminded in the beginning, when i was a kid, my father was taking a friend of mine to go see butch cassidy and the sun dance kid. he said, you know, remember, whatever the movie makes of them, they are the bad guys, and the other thing that it reminded me of was the old line from mel brooke in
're black or white, latino, asian america or native american. it doesn't matter whether we're straight or gay, we're one people -- >> the actual anniversary is wednesday, that is when president obama will speak from the steps of the lincoln memorial along with former president bill clinton and jimmy carter. close tore home, hundreds of people marched in san jose, they walked about a mile to the county building shouting, slogans and drumming. there was one woman who marched in washington 50 years ago and sat in her view there has been significant progress that more needs to be done. still ahead this morning what san francisco has to do to live up to the i have a dream speech. >>> on the action san francisco may take against nevada for dumping mentally ill patients in california. surfers and swimmers banned because of a shark. >> the weather department much more tranquil we're looking for a pleasant area once we dispense look at the nation's midsection. they're heating up and they're cooling down, good forecast for you after a break. ,,,, bay area headlines... stins beach is re-opening t
for the the cup. abc7 news reporter lilian kim is live at the america's cup park. hi, lilian. >> ama, two sailing power houses will be facing off in less than two weeks. it is not really a surprise, but fans are excited nonetheless. >> it is a clean start. >> em rete's team new zealand faced off against the luna rosa for the final time. in the end the kimi came out ahead as they had for most of the series. team new zealand now advances to the premiere event, the america's cup where they will take on the defending champion or cal team usa. they stressed how important it is for them to win. >> one thing my dad told me was never to start a speech with an apology. the only reason we are in san francisco is to take the cup away. >> relations have been tense for quite some time. things got worse in recent weeks when team new zealand accused oracle of cheating after it modified its boats during warm up races. sailing enthusiasts say it will be a good match up. >> i think they will put up a good fight. >> i think oracle has their work cut out for them to be sure. but we always have to root for the americ
need to do we need to acquit allies, it cannot look like america jumping in to another civil war in the middle east trying to get involved. this should be the world community coming together, not everybody in the world, we need to make it clear we have no interest in getting in the middle of this civil war, no interest in choosing sides and getting out. lori: can you pinpoint but chemical weapons? can you take out those chemical weapons with a missile strike or do you have to have boots and the ground? do you know the particulars of that? >> some say you have to have. on the ground. everything i read from credible people that i trust say that you can do this from a standoff, you can have ships in the mediterranean, tomahawk cruise missiles equipped in a certain way but if these syrian chemical weapons depots, we know the israelis have done this, they have bombed and taken out syrian chemical weapons sites, i don't know why we couldn't be able to do that but if we go and think we are going to topple assad or kill assad what is the next government that goes after assad? al qaeda. t
today could be the bloody war that america might be on the verge of joining. >> the closing bell rang about ament and a half ago. you can always count on uncertainty to rattle the market. that's exactly what happened here with syria's news these days. investors are on edge over the possibility of a u.s. military strike on syria. any time we have geopolitical or war-related issues, you're going to see investors hit the sell button and pile up on assets that are more safe. it's the reason that investors were buying up gold and treasuries and then you go ahead and roll into the market's already nervous about when the fed is going to pull back on its stimulus. so you factor in any type of unrest in the mideast, it just adds to the anxiety. oil prices closing up 3%, closing at $109 a barrel. syria is ranked 32nd among global producers but the concern is there could be this risk of a spillover, if neighboring countries get involved. if we could see a ripple effect, we could see oil prices rise even more and that could translate to higher gas prices for consumers, john, who are already watch
of america's most original and influential... depp: the sixties begin with a shot. [ gunshot ] the civil rights movement intensifies. the war in vietnam gets bigger and bldier. man: president johnson, meanwhile, let it be known that the fbi is closely watching all anti-war activity. depp: the youth movement catches fire, making everyone over 30 a cultural enemy. the days of ricky nelson and "leave it to beaver" are over. i have nothing against kissing. but these friends of yours, penny, they want to kiss you all night. depp: the establishment resists, but a genuine counter-culture is growing. for some, psychedelics like lsd open the doors of perception. the doors: ♪ the gate is straight ♪ deep and wide, break on through ♪ depp: a massive cultural earthquake is splitting the country wide open. and out of the crack steps a band called the doors. man: name? robby krieger. age? 22 years old. occupation? guitar. name? john densmore. age? 23. occupation? percussionist. name? raymond daniel manzarek. age? born 2/12/39. occupation? musician, organist. name? uh, jim. occupation? um... depp:
pushing to make high-quality preschool available for every four-year-old in america it's time for the minimum wage to go up. (cheers) but i won't be able to do it alone, so i'm going to be calling... on all of us to take up this cause. good jobs; a better bargain for the middle class... and the folks who are working to get into the middle class; an economy that grows from the middle-out. that's what we need. (cheers) like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ to take skincare to the next level you're ready for roc® new roc® multi correxion has an exclusive 5 in 1 formula it's clinically proven to hydrate dr
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
. lots in california. >> happiest cities in america. >> on the west coast. i know green bay, wisconsin, made that list. >> it did. we were all surprised about hi. my name is cj. a few years ago, my father became seriously ill. i did what i could do before he passed, but it took its toll. i lost my job, my house. i'm getting back on my feet, but i don't know when there'll be food on the table. how'd i do, cj? we could be twins. well, cousins maybe. announcer: play a role in ending hunger. visit feedingamerica.org/hunger and find your local food bank. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- terror fears. new details about a threat that has forced the u.s. to close embassies overseas all week and strengthen security here at home. >> plot to kill. the ugly accusations and allegations against an attractive college co-ed. police and prosecutors say a 21-year-old student was out for some lethal revenge against two ex-boyfriends. >> getting bullish, not in spain but in the u.s. coming to the cities coast to coast. why the events are so controversial and why some people cannot wait to run for t
is america's biggest foreign policy head ache right now. president obama and his security team met yesterday to decide how to respond. >> abc's global affairs correspondent martha raddatz traveled to cairo for an exclusive interview with the man at center of the crisis there. >> he is one of the most powerful men in egypt right now, a civilian leader behind the military's brutal crackdown on its own people. >> no country will allow to have a paramilitary people taking to the streets, preventing simple inhabitants in the neighborhood not able to go out. >> reporter: they were killed for doing that. >> we didn't provoke it. we asked them to go freely. we started by throwing only tear gas and they answered back by firing. >> reporter: the result, more than 1,000 egyptians dead. most of them for protesting the military seizing power. you do not believe egyptian security forces used excessive force at all? >> i cannot say that all of the police are peaceful. of course, there are some exceptions. i cannot say 100%. but i am sure that by and large they try to abide. >> reporter: so no remorse for w
stains. ♪ >>> america just can't compete in this connected world without a super fast information highway. that's why the government has set aside billions to upgrade the nation's internet service. >> but abc's david kerley found $1 million wasted in a single closet in west virginia on the washington watch dog beat. [ modem handshaking ] >> reporter: speed, we crave it on the internet. a fast connection. we need it to remain competitive in a global economy says the president. >> to harness the full power of the internet. that means faster and more widely available broadband. >> reporter: the to spread broadband the government came up with $7 billion and thousands of communities have been hooked up. but take a look at this -- these boxes stacked up in a west virginia closet are blazing fast, high speed routers, you paid for them $20,000 each. they're unused. the state bought too many and the wrong ones. $1.25 million in this closet gathering dust for nearly three years now. enough for a year's pay for 30 teachers. that's not all. congressional investigators questioned other spendin
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
to become -- we're marching towards becoming the most economically robust parks program in america. we had a cell phone app, parka meanttionv, park hours, park programs. we can now register online and having wi-fi in our parks will make it easier for park users and frankly our staff to deliver the programs and services that the public expects in our open space. so, we're thrilled ~. government can't do it alone any more, so, this is really about partnership. we're so thankful to google and veronika, thank you for hanging with us. thank you to sf city. a big thanks to mark, supervisor farrell for stewarding this. and also a big thanks to the mayor who has really given us room to be innovative, room to pursue public private partnerships and has really supported innovation in our parks. and, john, thank you for hosting us here. supervisor avalos has been an incredible advocate for our neighborhood parks and one of the things great about this gift, this is not just going to parks frequented by tourists or destination parks. this is a benefit that is going into our neighborhoods. so, we're real
in this tepid economy. >> well, jehmu -- >> person with the minimum wage -- average person in america is making $53,000 a year with a minimum wage worker, that's over two times the poverty rate. minimum wage has little to do with poverty. >> in fact, tracy, it's not the recession that americans are pointing to about why it's wrong to be dependent on government. but, in fact, it's the ease of getting a system. it's not the recession. you can get food stamps quite easily. >> look, i agree with jehmu. there was a time when it was embarrassing. my family immigrated, they would never in a million years take a government handout. things have changed, jehmu since you were a kid. hey, my neighbor's getting a check, i want one too. how come i didn't get a first-time home buyers check. everyone else got something i didn't. now we're starting to feel like, hey, where's my cut. and that's a bad, bad place for our country to be in. >> do you want to respond? >> well, again, i know from personal experience that the majority, overwhelming majority of people who are having to receive these programs to stand in
. this is why birth rate is too low in america. let me say, you can solve this problem, pay for dinner, and be a cheap skate because you can get two for one -- >> no wonder you're not married. >> any dead beat man who doesn't open a door for a woman and make her pay -- >> i pay so much alimony to my husband, i'm never having dinner again. "cavuto on business" up next. >> did harry reid let his party's real health care plan out of the bag? good morning. it looks like democrats go along with with the bad private health care in america. that's not me saying it, although i have often said it. more on me later, my favorite subject. now back to the senate majority leader and what he was saying when asked about whether he was actually working to scrap our present health care basis. >> we are far from having something that will work. >> eventuall
system now? what can be done to pull america out of this tepid period of growth? we are joined by incredible experts on the panel. mohammed el-erian, ceo of pacific investment management company. sheila bair, senior adviser to charitable trusts. john taylor, professor of economics at stanford university and senior fellow at the hoover institution. he is well-known for the taylor rule, a monetary policy principle that offers guidance on how to tinker with interest rates to control inflation. taylor served as undersecretary of the treasury during the george w. bush administration and was part of the council of economic advisers. specimen so much for being here today. -- thank you so much for being here today. special thanks to mohammed el- erian and mr. taylor for flying from california. i want to kick off the panel with you. you coined the term, the new normal in 2009. your outlook for the economy has been dead on. how much longer is this economy going to remain in the new normal? >> let me take you back to 2009 when the new normal concept came out. the idea was to signal that i
, but what is the risk of the social fabric of america beginning to fray? >> it is fraying. it is fraying because we started out with social inequality and now it is getting worse. it is getting worse because of the policies we are pursuing to try and restart our economy. if the fed is the only policy making entity in play today in washington, not by choice but by necessity, the fed can only act using indirect policies. it cannot invest in infrastructure. it cannot change the tax code. it has to convince people to do things. how does it convince people? the idea is very simple. you make asset markets unofficially high. the wealth effect, people feel richer. maybe companies will invest more who owns financial assets? you have this irony in using imperfect policy by necessity, you make income inequality worse. >> ms. bair, do you believe that this is contributing to the widening of income inequality? >> i do. it is not trickle down. it has resulted in financial asset inflation. that benefits people who own financial assets who are the wealthier folks. there are not quality jobs. the vast ma
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
>>> making news in america this morning -- growing pressure. the obama administration says a chemical weapons attack did kill hundreds of people in syria, as the u.s. moves closer to military action. we're live in washington with the latest. >>> gaining ground. firefighters finally making progress on a massive wildfire burning near yosemite national park. but the concern is far from over. >>> subway scare. an elderly man gets his foot stuck in a train door and goes on a terrifying ride. >>> and caught off guard. what question puzzled the beauty pageant contestant, prompting this response -- >> and believing when you see, it's perfect. >>> good tuesday morning, everyone. we begin with the growing crisis in syria and what is increasingly appearing to be an imminent u.s. strike against the assad regime. >> it comes after u.n. weapons inspectors visited the apparent site of a chemical attack last week. and now, this morning, the strongest words yet from a u.s. official. abc's devin dwyer has the latest from washington. good morning, devin. >> reporter: good morning. the strong
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